Author Topic: First Aid & the Good Samaritan  (Read 20460 times)

mimi

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Re: First Aid & the Good Samaritan
« Reply #15 on: November 11, 2012, 07:30:28 am »
Just wanted to add my 2 cents.  Yes, the porch looks very nice, even without the gingerbread you're going to add.  But, I'm concerned about your daughter's finger!  Did she finally have someone who knows what he's doing look at it?

Mike Briggs

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Re: First Aid & the Good Samaritan
« Reply #16 on: November 11, 2012, 10:45:09 am »
She was SUPPOSED to go to the doctor on Friday evening.  We put extra money in her account to cover the costs.  I don't know if she actually went.   If not, it's not for lack of urging by the parental units.  The problem with kids is they get to be eighteen or twenty and they start making decisions on their own.  It's enough to make a parent crazy!
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Patti L.

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Re: First Aid & the Good Samaritan
« Reply #17 on: November 11, 2012, 10:47:11 am »
It's not like we went around making decisions on our own when we hit 18 or 20, sheesh.
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CarolKat

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Re: First Aid & the Good Samaritan
« Reply #18 on: November 11, 2012, 10:47:51 am »
That's the truth! I think it was better when they weren't considered legal adults.  ;D :)

When I'm good I am real good  >D , When I'm bad I'm even better :-whistle

mimi

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Re: First Aid & the Good Samaritan
« Reply #19 on: November 11, 2012, 10:55:13 am »
Carolkat - Don't get me started on the legal adult thing!  Having an 18 year old go to the doctor and then having the doc not be able to talk to you with out the child's permission?!   >:(  Anyway, I'm better now.  Ah, the joys of parenthood!

Mike - Hope the finger is being taken care of.  And, thank you for a very amusing story.  I wasn't in a library when I read it so I could laugh out loud with impunity.  Good luck!

CarolKat

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Re: First Aid & the Good Samaritan
« Reply #20 on: November 11, 2012, 10:56:43 am »
Sorry mimi, mine are all now in their 30's, but I do remember.

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Kyria

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Re: First Aid & the Good Samaritan
« Reply #21 on: November 11, 2012, 03:00:15 pm »
Carolkat - Don't get me started on the legal adult thing!  Having an 18 year old go to the doctor and then having the doc not be able to talk to you with out the child's permission?!   >:(  Anyway, I'm better now.  Ah, the joys of parenthood

Given the dramatics I've had to deal with since turning 18, let me just say: Thank [deity of your choice] for the law that says once I turned 18, certain things could not be shared with my dad without my permission.  Situations might resolve themselves faster when dad gets involved, but they tend to resolve themselves more pleasantly if dad is NOT involved.  I love my dad, but I am grateful every day that I now have the choice to say, "no.  we will deal with this my way." 
And if he decides he's not going to speak to me for the next month, well... at least I always make sure the last thing I say to him is "I love you," before I leave or hang up.

That isn't to say I advocate kids cutting their parents out of their lives.  I fill my parents in on what's going on in my life.  But I'm thankful every day that when things aren't going my way, I have legality on my side when I say, "No, Dad, you will absolutely not be getting involved.  I will take care of it myself and if the time comes when I desire your assistance, I will ask for it."

Mike Briggs

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Re: First Aid & the Good Samaritan
« Reply #22 on: November 11, 2012, 07:29:33 pm »
Kyria:
All joking aside, it's important for kids to grow up and stand on their own feet.  Parents, for the most part, are delighted to see it happen.  We love our children, but we don't want them dependent upon us forever.  The whole point of parenting is to teach them to make wise and well reasoned choices on their own.  I'm sure your dad is proud of you, just like we're proud of our children.

It IS sometimes hard to let go, to let them make mistakes that we've learned to avoid.  Once in a while they decide to do something that's just forehead-slapping dumb, and we have to basically converse in low whispers and say, "Is it likely to be fatal, or to have lifelong consequences?"  If so, we do the horrible parent thing and try our dardest to convince the child in question to change course, even resorting to emotional blackmail, knowing it's costing us some "good parent points".  Fortunately, there's only been one case like that I can think of.  If the consequences of the kid's decision are going to be confined to a few months of financial woe or  some emotional distress, we generally play the supportive parents and let them take their knocks.  Sometimes, they've make things work smoothly that I would have bet against, and you have to admit that they were right, and we would have backed the wrong pony. 

In simplest terms, there's nothing more innately human than trying to control our own destiny.  It's critical that parents allow their children to take the helm.  Sometimes that means I don't actually know if Jordan went to the doctor, and how it worked out. At least she asked our opinion -- which means she's thinking and weighing the options.
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Grandpappy Wycked

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Re: First Aid & the Good Samaritan
« Reply #23 on: November 17, 2012, 10:43:02 am »
I got very lucky when it came to getting my FA Merit badge. My teacher was a First Responder who got his start as an Army Corpman from the Korean war. He taught from the training manual that the S&R/First Responders learned from. Not the BSA First Aid book.

The very First Thing I was TAUGHT to do... Open my mouth and say "Don't Move"... Unless they were in a life threatening position. Second thing..."Take a deep breath if you can and let it out slow..." with me taking the breath right along with them.From there, evaluation started.

It has sadly been used more in my life than I care to both count and remember, friends, aquaintances, people I don't know. Being on scene when bikers have hit the road, at times has saved their lives, when the others on scene would have permanently injured or killed them. Hell when I hit the road, the first person to get to me after watching me bounce down the road 300+ yards reached for the neck strap on my helmet. I was yelling at him to back the F*CK off...his response.. "Dude, you can't breath, I gotta get your helmet off!"
Duh, reality check, if I am yelling at you, I can breath just fine...

As for the things our kids do...yeah, not going to go there...Hopefully your daughter did the next right thing and got it looked at, not all 'Super Glue' is non-toxic...
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Kyria

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Re: First Aid & the Good Samaritan
« Reply #24 on: November 17, 2012, 09:12:52 pm »
I managed to screw up my WFA instructor's lesson on counting breaths because I don't like to be touched, particularly by people I don't know well... so when they were trying to count my breathing after checking me over, I kept accidentally doing meditative breathing... at about 6-8 breaths per minute.  Holy crap.  I swear, it doesn't feel that slow when I'm doing it.  Just relaxed. 

Mike Briggs

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Re: First Aid & the Good Samaritan
« Reply #25 on: November 19, 2012, 03:08:05 pm »
LOL!  I've never used any of my training "for real" other than a couple of broken bones and moderate lacerations.  Kudos to you Wycked, for keeping your head (and helmet) under stress.

Kyria:
Training can be . . . interesting.  My rescue diver training was actually much more challenging than I had expected it to be, and having an instructor shut my air down without warning 100 feet down brought me closer to panic than I'd expected.   LOL   I don't think I looked as calm as relaxed as I was supposed to!

When I was getting my water safety cert when I was like 14 I ran into an interesting problem.  I was kind of shy around girls, and our instructor was Becky Larson, the heart-throb of the high school.  Watching her in a swimsuit was way closer to Baywatch than a classroom.  So, after a brief description of the "cross chest carry" she jumps in the pool and asks me to rescue her.  Amid the cheers of my classmates I went in, came up behind her, and very gingerly insinuated my arm across her neck, trying to steer clear of  some very impressive mammaries. 

She grabbed the hand that was kind-of near her shoulder, spun around, and went straight for the bottom.  I learned that Becky was an excellent swimmer, and that she could hold her breath longer than I could.   :o As soon as I could breathe again, she chewed me up one side and down the other, then told me to do it again.  This time I secured her firmly, my arm wedged across her chest and my hand basically holding her pectoral muscle by her armpit.  She struggled, and I held on for dear life while I paddled for the side.  I learned that safety trumps modesty -- and rescuing girls is not without it's perks.  8)

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Kyria

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Re: First Aid & the Good Samaritan
« Reply #26 on: November 19, 2012, 04:09:51 pm »
I have a fortunate reaction to sudden lack of air while diving: Instant calm and focus.  Because I panic when I have to replace the strap of my mask.  I can clear the mask no problem, but the strap gets stuck in my hair and that inevitably leads to me snorting water up my nose and that triggers panic. 

Fortunately, when I tested on that skill, I knocked my reg out of my mouth and instantly, everything was fine.  My brain went, "No air = problem.  Calm down.  React rationally.  Be safe." 
My favorite skills to practice were anything that involved sudden lack of air, for exactly that reason. Breathing control? not a problem at all. 

Mike Briggs

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Re: First Aid & the Good Samaritan
« Reply #27 on: November 19, 2012, 07:07:40 pm »
OK, I'm officially jealous.   :-[   If I know that I'm going to be without air for a bit I'm fine. Give me a minute to prep, get my brain on the job, and I'm fine.  At one point I could do well over two minutes without air (now it's more like twenty seconds).  But I've never been able to completely suppress the gibbering hind brain that wants to panic if the air stops suddenly.  Nope nope nope.  Forget focus and training -- I'm going up like a Poseidon missile, there's air up there!
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Kyria

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Re: First Aid & the Good Samaritan
« Reply #28 on: November 19, 2012, 08:03:00 pm »
The girl who was in training with me had a hard time with things like that.  It's honestly a reasonable thing to be a little bit freaked out by.  I'm very glad that it doesn't bother me.  If I could work out a fail-safe method to teach that to others, I could probably move to a resort town and teach people to dive. 

What I panic about is very silly and unreasonable: I get claustrophobic about wetsuits.  If the water is cold enough, I can jolt myself out of it by tugging the neoprene away from my skin and flooding my suit with fresh cold water (this is also why I'm so picky about gloves, and I NEVER wear gloves to keep my hands warm while diving), but I missed out on my first dive at the Great Barrier Reef because "OK, this is really tight and restrictive" exploded into a full-blown panic attack... within three seconds of me hitting the water.  It was a little bit ridiculous, honestly. 
 
For future reference: relatively-cold-adapted organisms like me don't usually need a wetsuit to dive at the GBR.  My second (and first ever wetsuit-free) dive attempt of the day was spectacular.  :)