Author Topic: another question about werewolf children.  (Read 37234 times)

munkee

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2008, 06:38:30 am »
Okay, so two werewolves reproduce a were child. (best case scenerio)
one werewolf and one human reproduce a human child
one werewolf and a walker reproduce, well, we're not sure yet.
one werewolf and a vampire?????? uhm, best not to think about that....
two humans reproduce a human child.

UHM, surroget moms?
werewolf egg and sperm in a human surroget?
would that beget a were baby?
I mean, I understand that there are protocols and goes against things, but sam's a desperate man.....and with no real pack to object (I can't see mercy objecting to it) and with him being a doc, what makes us think he hasn't already HAD this thought, just trying to find a mate and a surroget?
OR was it the fact that charles' mom was magic as well as were, I mean, there's no one else LIKE charles out there is there.

dsgholam

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #16 on: April 27, 2008, 02:27:54 pm »
It would seem that test tube babies would not have really worked before the revelation of werewolves to the world, because it would have required not just any doctor, but a genetics expert to make sure both necessary parts were completely human and a doctor able to put the fertilized egg into a surrogate. Due to the demand in the werewolf community for general practice doctors, I doubt they really could have spared someone to go through the training to become such a specialist.

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berneynator

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #17 on: April 28, 2008, 01:57:59 pm »
In the case of a surrogate, would the baby Change in the womb? That could definitely be a problem, especially later on when the fetus is significantly different from a human one. Who wants little claws on the end of those kicking feet? Same with a test tube- I certainly don't know much about the technology, but probably the same nutrients and stuff wouldn't work for a wolf cub as for a human baby- and IV-type things could get jerked out by the Change. Plus, you'd have to have someone on watch 24-7 because how are you supposed to know what's going to upset a were-fetus to the point of Change?

Schlinkie

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #18 on: April 30, 2008, 11:59:47 am »
As dsgholam was saying though, a human surrogate mother would only work if she was carrying a wholly human baby from two werewolf parents.  I always assumed the issue with miscarriages was due to the human mother's body rejecting the fetus, not the baby's survivability.

Unless we're getting way sci-fi and you're thinking of an entirely artificial womb, usually a test tube baby is only in a test tube for the very beginning of its development.

Still, even though a test tube baby could result in a human baby from two (very wealthy and technology embracing) werewolf parents, the parents would still outlive the children, or they'd be risking death trying to Change.  Plus, unless there was a way to identify a 'werewolf gene' before implantation in the surrogate, it would still be hit & miss with miscarriages for the surrogate mother.

Tambayo

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #19 on: May 15, 2008, 11:53:57 am »
Reacting to a number of remarks made in this topic (don't want to quote them all).

C-section on a werewolf would be very painful. Painkillers and tranquilizers (safe ones) don't work on weres.

To stay balanced for 6 or 9 months in wolf shape, maybe an Omega could help with that?

Charles was born from were x were parents, i am assuming that is why he was born were.
All other children are born from were x human parents, thus you get a mix from 2 different species, and incompatible DNA. No wonder that there are a lot of miscarriages as a result. 

Charles mother died from fighting the compulsion to change every full moon. Not from staying in wolf shape.

jenniwee

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #20 on: May 16, 2008, 01:55:12 pm »
Here's something else to think about.

If a were stayed in wolf form, how long could she carry the baby?

Human gestation lasts for 40 weeks.  While the baby becomes viable after 20 (after this any early delivery is called premature (stillbirth if the baby is dead) rather than a miscarriage).  However survival rates at 20 weeks are very, very low. 

The gestational period of a wolf is less than 10 weeks, which doesn't even get a human pregnancy out of the first trimester.

So, my point is, would a were in wolf form be able to carry a pregnancy long enough for the baby to be viable, or would she lose the baby the same as if she stayed in human form?

Tambayo

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #21 on: May 16, 2008, 02:03:03 pm »
Here's something else to think about.

If a were stayed in wolf form, how long could she carry the baby?

Human gestation lasts for 40 weeks.  While the baby becomes viable after 20 (after this any early delivery is called premature (stillbirth if the baby is dead) rather than a miscarriage).  However survival rates at 20 weeks are very, very low. 

The gestational period of a wolf is less than 10 weeks, which doesn't even get a human pregnancy out of the first trimester.

So, my point is, would a were in wolf form be able to carry a pregnancy long enough for the baby to be viable, or would she lose the baby the same as if she stayed in human form?
And if a were gets pregnant while in wolf shape? What would the baby be?

Suzi

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #22 on: May 17, 2008, 06:24:52 am »
I wouldn't have thought staying changed would be an option from a practical point of view. If a female werewolf wasn't "out", disappeared for 10 + weeks and then reappeared with a child (if gestation was wolf lengh) there would be questions asked. Even if she got a note from the doctor saying that she couldn't work because of the chance she would lose the child, I would have thought her work mates/friends would get very worried if they realised that no one had actually spoken to her for that length of time.

Mike Briggs

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #23 on: May 19, 2008, 06:35:08 am »
Hello everyone   ;)

Boy, this whole notion that the werewolves can't have babies has really brought out some good suggestions and generated a lot of thought.  I think it's sweet that so many readers want the werewolves to be happy that they've put time into thinking up ways around the problem.

 Patty's been going with the whole "The violence of the change causes a miscarriage early in the pregnancy".  The change is violent and painful -- and would be like kicking a pregnant woman in the stomach, hard.  If you imagine a woman who get's kicked in the stomach a couple of times a month, it's hard to see her successfully bearing children.

There wolves are also anachronistic, and other than Samuel, few of the old wolves have really embraced modern medicine (after all, they don't need it).  However, we got a really well reasoned letter the other day from reader who was obviously a little upset that the wolves didn't appear to be taking this problem seriously -- no wonder all the female wolves are bitchy grumpy.

So, Patty wrote to a couple of doctors we know and explained the situation as it exists in her books, and asked for either a medically sound confirmation/elaboration on why werewolves can't have children, or a way around the problems that could be discovered later.

From a world-building standpoint, the wolves probably should be doing more to allow the female pack members to bear children.  From a story-telling standpoint, having a whole bunch of pregnant weres is awkward.   I don't know what Patty's going to do with the situation, but it's obviously important to the readers so she's taking a closer look at it.  ;)

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #24 on: May 19, 2008, 10:18:49 am »
I just realised something- its hard enough being a werewolf due to their volatile natures. And I suppose to some extent female weres suffering from PMS now that is definitetly dont mess with me because its THAT time of the month :D

But imagine a pregnant werewolf that is truly scary - Bran was a very lucky and brave man  to survive that ;D

And even though if a woman is pregnant it doesnt mean she cant  kick ass. I can imagine some scary female werewolves if they managed to solve the pregnancy problems.
And one of the best examples of a strong female who is pregnant is Aeryn Sun from Farscape- she was shooting down the enemies while in labour in the PK Wars mini series. She had the best quote ever in that movie  " Shooting makes me feel better" while she was having contractions  ;)
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Snoopy

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #25 on: May 19, 2008, 10:57:20 am »
A werewolf with PMS, that is too funny!! I just almost busted a gut!!
 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

Sounds reasonable, though, I have to admit.

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Patti L.

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #26 on: May 19, 2008, 11:20:39 am »
And female normal wolves hunt pretty much through their pregnancy, so yeah, there could be some kicking going on.  Consider that Mercy probably isn't the first female Walker, maybe, if they can get in contact with others, there could be some help for female weres from that source?
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Gerd D.

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #27 on: May 19, 2008, 02:49:09 pm »
And I suppose to some extent female weres suffering from PMS now that is definitetly dont mess with me because its THAT time of the month :D
Would that make it a Pre Moonstrual Syndrom then?  ::)
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Ellyll

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #28 on: May 19, 2008, 03:03:52 pm »
Would that make it a Pre Moonstrual Syndrom then?  ::)

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Re: another question about werewolf children.
« Reply #29 on: May 20, 2008, 12:34:00 pm »
Hey All,

I've been AWOL - apologies. What a fascinating topic. I must admit I'm slightly surprised that the female werewolves haven't looked into this further. I just had a thought - most female werewolves are changed AFTER puberty yes? I'm just wondering if being changed before puberty (like....the girl we met in IK whose name I can't remember - is it Kara?). Would that make a difference? Because, while I know that werewolves are made, not born, nature has a habit of working its way around obstacles to ensure the perpetuation of the species :)

orannia

EDIT: Made by Cole
This getting off topic, a bit, I will create a new thread for your new question.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2008, 05:49:51 pm by Sleepy Squirrel »