Author Topic: Iron Kissed -- RE: Pack influence on Mercy's Choice  (Read 4838 times)

jenniwee

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Iron Kissed -- RE: Pack influence on Mercy's Choice
« on: July 29, 2007, 08:12:16 pm »
Ok, this is a fairly complex question, so I hope I phrase this so that it is understandable.

About Mercy's decision in Iron Kissed, you said in the last chat that she makes two choices, one in the middle of the book and one at the end.  Is she forced to make the first decision because her status threatens Adam's authority with the pack?

Here is my reasoning:  Honey says in Blood Bound that all unmated female weres belong to the Alpha.  I assumed from both Honey's statement and Mercy's reaction that this was a sexual type of "belonging."  This seems to imply that sexual dominance is a vital part of an Alpha's power, even if he chooses, like Adam, not to utilize it.  So, since most of the pack is already ambivalent about Mercy's standing as Adam's mate (Warren obeys her, yet another were won't let her into the house when Warren is injured because she is not pack), do they interpret Sam's pursuit of Mercy and Mercy's indecision (not to metion her cohabitation with Sam) as a sign of weakness in Adam?  And if they do, is Mercy forced to make a hasty decision to ensure Adam's status as Alpha and peace in the pack?
« Last Edit: October 15, 2008, 11:31:23 pm by Elle »

Patty Briggs

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Re: Iron Kissed
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2007, 09:01:32 pm »
Okay, I'm going to try to give as little away (so that you enjoy the book!) as I can and still answer your question.

Your speculations about the effect of Mercy not clearly choosing Adam or Samuel is spot on.  There is a little more to it than that -- which Mercy finds out in Iron Kissed (and so will you <grin>).  Mercy must make a choice soon, or Adam's pack will really suffer.  Notice that this just adds urgency to Mercy's choice -- but does not dictate it.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2007, 09:12:58 pm by Patty Briggs »