Author Topic: "Werewolf Factor" vs. Human Immunity  (Read 4487 times)

pocket_knight

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"Werewolf Factor" vs. Human Immunity
« on: November 26, 2007, 11:41:06 pm »
First... Just wanted to let you know that my copies of "Blood Bound" and "Moon Calling" were total impulse buys. There is something to be said about having a strong start to a story... I was hooked after reading the first few pages in the book store and grabbed the second without bothering to open it. Usually I flip around a book before I have an idea if it is for me. Mostly an SF reader, I gravitate towards fantasy that breaks the LOTR conventions. Nice to have a fantasy set in modern times that isn't 'cyberpunk-ish' (nothing wrong with that, but I can only read so many stories that look like the Shadowrun RPG).

Now for the question... most of questions here seem to be about relationships, but my inner nerd wants me to ask a technical question...

In the first book (still in the process of reading it), it was mentioned that becoming a werewolf was rare since it a person needed to be beaten to near death to make the person's immune system vulnerable enough to not neutralize whatever "werewolf factors" that are injected from the bite. Has Sam or any other werewolf doctor ever thought of using modern immuno-suppressing drugs for organ transplants, or drugs designed to totally knock out the immune system for bone marrow transplants to make it less dangerous to bring over 'volunteers' like non-were family members?

Of course, this question assumes there is already a backstory on this :)
« Last Edit: October 15, 2008, 11:05:25 pm by Elle »

Patty Briggs

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Re: "Werewolf Factor" vs. Human Immunity
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2008, 07:17:26 pm »
That is a very good question.  The answer is no, they haven't.  Samuel is one of two doctors who are also werewolves that I know about (the two don't mix well . . . all that blood and stress is bad for doctors).  I don't know why that didn't occur to Samuel -- he's been a little preoccupied for the last fifteen or sixteen years -- and research isn't really his thing.  The other doctor was changed without his consent -- and he's not yet worried about helping people turn into werewolves.

This is a very good area for Someone to work on -- maybe it'll show up later.
Best,
Patty