Author Topic: Neil Gaiman  (Read 20539 times)

Carradee

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #15 on: December 04, 2008, 11:41:16 am »
I preferred Stardust the movie over the book, actually.

But I recently read Neverwhere.  Though I won't call it a favorite, I definitely appreciate the techniques and development and it sticks with me.

Not sure who of my friends would like it, though, since I'm second to the most morbid, and Neverwhere creeped me out.

Litwolf

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #16 on: December 19, 2008, 07:50:27 am »
The only thing Ive read by Neil Gaiman was Stardust and, having seen the movie first, I liked the film better (mostly because it seemed like the couple really loved each other and had a much more happily ever after than in the book).

Neil Gaiman is coming to my college this semester so I wanted to read more by him. Everyone I talk to says 'American Gods' without a second thought. Could some possibly give me a brief summary with few spoilers? All my friends have told me is that its about a guy who meets all these different gods.


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Kate

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #17 on: December 19, 2008, 08:44:55 am »
Well, first off, my number one Neil Gaiman recommendation is usually Good Omens, which he co-wrote with Terry Pratchett (who writes the Discworld books). It's a really awesome blending of their styles and I usually read it at least once a year, much to my husband's consternation, because I giggle my way through the entire book. Here's the Amazon description of it:

Pratchett (of Discworld fame) and Gaiman (of Sandman fame) may seem an unlikely combination, but the topic (Armageddon) of this fast-paced novel is old hat to both. Pratchett's wackiness collaborates with Gaiman's morbid humor; the result is a humanist delight to be savored and reread again and again. You see, there was a bit of a mixup when the Antichrist was born, due in part to the machinations of Crowley, who did not so much fall as saunter downwards, and in part to the mysterious ways as manifested in the form of a part-time rare book dealer, an angel named Aziraphale. Like top agents everywhere, they've long had more in common with each other than the sides they represent, or the conflict they are nominally engaged in. The only person who knows how it will all end is Agnes Nutter, a witch whose prophecies all come true, if one can only manage to decipher them. The minor characters along the way (Famine makes an appearance as diet crazes, no-calorie food and anorexia epidemics) are as much fun as the story as a whole, which adds up to one of those rare books which is enormous fun to read the first time, and the second time, and the third time...

I also think American Gods is brilliant, but it's a much denser kind of novel. I've read it a few times, and it always takes me several days to read it--which is not really a bad thing. :) Here's the Amazon description of it:

American Gods is Neil Gaiman's best and most ambitious novel yet, a scary, strange, and hallucinogenic road-trip story wrapped around a deep examination of the American spirit. Gaiman tackles everything from the onslaught of the information age to the meaning of death, but he doesn't sacrifice the razor-sharp plotting and narrative style he's been delivering since his Sandman days.

Shadow gets out of prison early when his wife is killed in a car crash. At a loss, he takes up with a mysterious character called Wednesday, who is much more than he appears. In fact, Wednesday is an old god, once known as Odin the All-father, who is roaming America rounding up his forgotten fellows in preparation for an epic battle against the upstart deities of the Internet, credit cards, television, and all that is wired. Shadow agrees to help Wednesday, and they whirl through a psycho-spiritual storm that becomes all too real in its manifestations. For instance, Shadow's dead wife Laura keeps showing up, and not just as a ghost--the difficulty of their continuing relationship is by turns grim and darkly funny, just like the rest of the book.

Armed only with some coin tricks and a sense of purpose, Shadow travels through, around, and underneath the visible surface of things, digging up all the powerful myths Americans brought with them in their journeys to this land as well as the ones that were already here. Shadow's road story is the heart of the novel, and it's here that Gaiman offers up the details that make this such a cinematic book--the distinctly American foods and diversions, the bizarre roadside attractions, the decrepit gods reduced to shell games and prostitution. "This is a bad land for Gods," says Shadow.

More than a tourist in America, but not a native, Neil Gaiman offers an outside-in and inside-out perspective on the soul and spirituality of the country--our obsessions with money and power, our jumbled religious heritage and its societal outcomes, and the millennial decisions we face about what's real and what's not.

I don't want to write the great American novel. I want to write the great American beach read. It pays better!

rox_squirrel

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #18 on: December 19, 2008, 09:41:15 am »
I think Caroline is being made into a movie  :)

Litwolf

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #19 on: February 08, 2009, 06:46:52 am »
Kate > Thanks for the summary of American Gods. Ill definitely borrow it from a friend at some point.

But I did get to read Coraline before going to see the movie! Oh my gosh, the book was fantastic and the movie was as well! I loved every minute of it!


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Talyn

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #20 on: April 17, 2009, 09:32:59 am »
I just recently finished American Gods, and I agree with Kate it is a very good book. I also have Good Omens, which I also think is immensely satisfying.

It is hard to explain, but I had this feeling of intense satisfaction after finishing both books that I don't get very often. The books ended and I was satisfied with the ending, there doesn't need to be a sequel or a prequel the book stands on it's own and you don't need more. Your just happy with the ending.

Maybe it is just me, but this author write very well and I will be buying more of his books in the future.

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ElefiNecol

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #21 on: April 17, 2009, 09:35:59 am »
If you haven't read it yet; The Graveyard Book was fantastic!  http://www.thegraveyardbook.com/

Talisman Maker

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #22 on: April 17, 2009, 09:39:08 am »
really?  I find him unsatisfying.  I have read good omens, which was OK, but not thrilling.  I read neverwhere, which I LOVED, but no one else has read or heard of it.  I just finished Stardust which I thought was very obvious and I almost dropped it a few times.  

I have american gods and I am planning on reading that in the future, but if I don't like that one, I think I'll stop reading him.  To each his own.  
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Kate

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #23 on: April 17, 2009, 11:46:24 am »
talisman--I really enjoyed Neverwhere. I loved the way he incorporated the surreal into our "real" world.

For all those who liked American Gods, you should pick up Anansi Boys, which uses a few of the same characters. :)

I don't want to write the great American novel. I want to write the great American beach read. It pays better!

Letitia

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #24 on: March 15, 2010, 12:15:51 pm »
Do.  Or, you might want to wait.  They're talking about a movie from it, and my advice with regard to those is that it's usually better to see the movie first, then the book expands what the movie showed you.  If you do it the other way around, the movie is usually a disappointment.

Ah! I know this is over two years over due - but that is my philosophy as well! I still haven't read the last Harry Potter because I don't want to dislike the movies. My sister-in-law, and many others, think I'm crazy for wanting to wait.

Anywho, I enjoyed Stardust. Good story. It was pretty neat to see a minor character with my name! That never happens.

Neverwhere was... Odd. Interesting. I enjoyed it, but it is a strange story. The BBC series was not very good. It didn't translate to screen very well.
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Brittany

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #25 on: July 26, 2010, 11:13:40 am »
I've read American Gods (loved it!) and I just bought Neverwhere the other day. I've heard it's good (and odd), so I'm hoping I'll enjoy it. I don't have many friends that reads his books, so I'm sure I'll be here posting about Neverwhere as soon as I finish it. :D
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Rob

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #26 on: May 04, 2011, 10:53:14 am »
*gets out map of Minnesota......*  I am going hunting for a certain politician......the Union wants to 'have a word' with him......

http://blastr.com/2011/05/politician-attacks-neil-g.php
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Patti L.

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #27 on: May 04, 2011, 10:59:42 am »
Education would be good...
And we must be sure to ban that name-caller from Hurog.
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Rob

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #28 on: August 29, 2011, 09:55:53 am »
For Neil Gaiman fans.....

Neil recently married musician, Amanda Palmer........before that, for his birthday, Amanda arranged a quirky 'flash mob' wedding in New Orleans, as a surprise for Neil for his birthday....

photos were taken by their friend, Kyle Cassidy (a photographer who is from my neck of the woods, Philly)

http://www.kylecassidy.com/pix/travel/2010/nfgafpnola/afp-nfg-wedding-album-1.pdf
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Varg

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Re: Neil Gaiman
« Reply #29 on: August 29, 2011, 10:15:43 am »
fun :)


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