Author Topic: Heavy Reads  (Read 9387 times)

Zealith

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Heavy Reads
« on: May 13, 2010, 03:06:30 pm »
My sister is taking a trip to India this summer, and she wants something to read on the plane.
So anyone have suggestions for books that take a while to read? She said, not just thick books that are easy to read, but something like Les Mis which took her nine months to read. Any suggestions?

Ellyll

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2010, 03:11:20 pm »
When I went to India, eons ago, I reread David Copperfield.
Dear Lord, be good to me.  The sea is so wide, and my boat is so small.

You let a wolf save your life, and you pay and you pay, and you pay...

Patti L.

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2010, 03:17:43 pm »
Asimov's "Foundation" series.
Brothers Karamozov?
Johnathon Strange & Mr. Norrell?
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Kate

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2010, 06:00:54 pm »
Well, there's the entire Wheel of Time series from Robert Jordan, which is up to, what, 12 books before it ends? I don't know that I'd recommend that unless she can get ebooks though... wouldn't pack light!

I don't want to write the great American novel. I want to write the great American beach read. It pays better!

gryphon340

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2010, 07:05:44 pm »
5000 year Leap
life is terminal

"We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the sermon of the mount" Omar N. Bradley, U.S Army General

jackie

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2010, 07:46:50 pm »
Jane Yolen's  "Briar Rose"  It's actually quite small, but very intense.  Possibly nightmare inducing.  A combination of the Sleeping Beauty tale and  WWII. 

Charles de Lint.  Anything by him.   

Ursula Le Guin's "Always Coming Home"  Thought provoking postapocalyptic - either collection of short stories and poetry or a novel.  Hard to tell which.  Good book either way.  I like giving it as a gift to thoughtful people who like to argue.

Kate

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2010, 06:49:15 am »
Oh! Anything by Tad Williams. If she likes modern stuff, his Otherland series is wild. I've only managed to get through book 1, but keep meaning to go back and read the rest. It's set in a near future world in which the Net is a complete virtual reality. And people keep getting sucked semi-permanently into it.

I don't want to write the great American novel. I want to write the great American beach read. It pays better!

Gerd D.

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2010, 07:27:19 am »
Well, not knowing Les Mis (apart from title and selected quotes, and having seen bits of the movie) just a few wild suggestions:

James Herbert's Dune (which I thought to be as dry as its title).
J. R. R. Tolkien, naturally.
Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars trilogy, not heavy heavy, more like a space soap with lots of characters to keep track of.
William Horwood's Wolves of Time, still need to read the second book, dark fantasy. The Wolf's Rain anime reminded me a bit of that.

If she likes horror, King's The Stand. Not really heavy either, but sizeable.
“Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape.”

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Patti L.

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2010, 07:35:06 am »
Space opera with lots of characters would also encompas Lisanne Norman's "Sholan Alliance" series; lots of characters to keep track of, and in later books, it gets really twisty with added elements pursuing their own agendas.
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Varg

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2010, 01:57:23 pm »
K.J. Parkers books fall under heavy reading for me. Very dense text full of layers. Takes me very long to read but they are very enjoyable. I have only finished the scavenger trilogy(Shadow, Pattern and Memory) so far. I liked those a lot.
Also Günther Grass, his book "Mein Jahrhundert"  is also of heavy reading.Sorry,I don't know what it is called in English.




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Pfefferminztee

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #10 on: May 14, 2010, 02:15:10 pm »
Anna Karenina by Tolstoy or War And Peace. I love Tolstoy and those are really thick books with a lot of plot and a variety of characters. 

Salarika

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2010, 01:31:06 am »
I just got out a couple of Pauline Gedge's - Lady of Reeds and House of Illusion, a duology set in ancient Egypt. For really heavy going, there's George R.R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire series, the Malazan novels, which I highly recommend, and Alexandre Dumas's Vicomte de Bragelonne - all three parts of it - which cured my insomnia.
Beyond the farthest shore
Beyond the land
My people are dancing
On the wind.
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Ellyll

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2010, 04:29:03 am »
Who wrote the Malazan novels?
Dear Lord, be good to me.  The sea is so wide, and my boat is so small.

You let a wolf save your life, and you pay and you pay, and you pay...

Salarika

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2010, 05:23:54 am »
Steven Erikson. The first one is Gardens of the Moon, and he's almost finished with the series (10 books).
Beyond the farthest shore
Beyond the land
My people are dancing
On the wind.
-Ursula K. LeGuin

Ellyll

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #14 on: May 19, 2010, 05:45:15 am »
Thanks.  :)
Dear Lord, be good to me.  The sea is so wide, and my boat is so small.

You let a wolf save your life, and you pay and you pay, and you pay...

wizardbear

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #15 on: April 13, 2011, 12:54:56 am »
I know this won't help the Original Poster, too late, but anyone looking for some heavy fantasy could try these:

Sean Russell - some fantasy sets, nice thick books, very complex worlds, very good:

Initiate Brother:
The series is laid in a fantasy empire combining aspects of China and Japan
Vol. 1: The Initiate Brother
Vol. 2: Gatherer of Clouds

Moontide and Magic Rise:
Vol. 1: World Without End
Vol. 2: Sea Without a Shore

The River into Darkness:
This fantasy duology is a prequel to the "Moontide and Magic Rise" duology.
Vol. 1: Beneath the Vaulted Hills
Vol. 2: The Compass of the Soul

Swans' War:
Vol. 1: The One Kingdom
Vol. 2: The Isle of Battle
Vol. 3: The Shadow Roads

Michelle West (who also writes as Michelle  Sagara)

The Sacred Hunt:
(as Michelle West, DAW Books)
Hunter's Oath
Hunter's Death

The Sun Sword:
(as Michelle West, DAW Books)
This is set in the same universe as The Sacred Hunt, but sixteen years later. Most of the events take place in the Empire of Essalieyan and the Dominion of Annagar (the Breodani play a minimal role). Events laid out in The Sacred Hunt are referenced, but are not necessary to understand the novels.
The Broken Crown
The Uncrowned King
The Shining Court
Sea of Sorrows
The Riven Shield
The Sun Sword

House War:
(as Michelle West, DAW Books)
Set in the same universe as The Sacred Hunt and The Sun Sword, House War chronicles the story of Jewel and House Terafin. Regarding the number of volumes, the author suggests at least five.(ongoing series)

The first three novels discover the origin of Jewel and her Den. They also revisit some of the narrative from Hunter's Death, though told from different (and complimentary) character perspectives.
The Hidden City: A Novel of the House War, Book 1
City of Night: A Novel of the House War, Book 2
House Name: A Novel of the House War, Book 3

Skirmish: A Novel of the House War, Book 4 (tentative title, no idea when it will be out)

It is not necessary to read either The Sun Sword or The Sacred Hunt series to follow the House War storyline. However, the concluding volumes (beginning with Skirmish) will pick up Jewel's thread following events of The Sun Sword.

All of these books together form a huge, very complex magical world, with plot lines running back and forth. I read them in publication order (haven't read the newest one yet) and the wait between books was agonizing. Try very hard to get a whole set, if you can, before you wade into them. Or at least each sub-segment.  :)
« Last Edit: April 13, 2011, 12:57:01 am by wizardbear »

Patti L.

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BillG

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #17 on: May 18, 2014, 01:53:15 am »
Deborah E. Harkness has a series that I merely started but couldn't keep reading. Intriguing story line, interesting characters, but I couldn't get into her writing.
A Discovery of Witches
Shadow of Night
The Book of Life
Another series with the same reaction from me, by Patrick Rofthuss, with two novels and a novella so far:
The Name of the Wind
The Wise Man's Fear
'The Slow Regard of Silent Things' is a companion story to the main, uncompleted trilogy.
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Patti L.

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #18 on: February 16, 2018, 10:38:08 am »
Reading these books affirmed why I read romance. Women’s feelings matter. And yet, the entire world tells us that our feelings are silly and inconsequential. In romance, I know that a heroine’s inner world will be treated with dignity and respect. No matter how raw, volatile, or ugly her feelings, there is a place for her in romance. Loving ourselves, our family, or our partners helps us to face even the most terrible tragedies. In our moments of most profound sorrow and loss, especially for a child, may all of us find solace in the arms of the ones we love.

http://www.tbqsbookpalace.com/2018/02/lets-talk-miscarriages-in-romance.html
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pondhawk

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Re: Heavy Reads
« Reply #19 on: February 16, 2018, 10:53:55 am »
Very thoughtful article.