Author Topic: An explanation of Tier and the city illusions.  (Read 6624 times)

Patty Briggs

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An explanation of Tier and the city illusions.
« on: September 07, 2007, 08:54:47 pm »
Just to let you know I haven't forgotten!  The question was raised about why Tier (who is immune to illusions) sees the city in Raven's Strike the same way that everyone else does -- at least that's the way I remember it.  If I don't have it right, feel free to re-ask the question.

The answer is that the spell on the buildings is not an illusion.  The wizards froze time in a very narrow band over most of the buildings.  Which is why you don't want to go running around on the "grass" because it is frozen in time and will cut you like a razor.

Patty
« Last Edit: January 22, 2012, 07:26:10 pm by Elle »

Mike Briggs

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Re: Raven duology
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2007, 09:09:32 pm »
Ah thanks, back to the drawing board . . . .I know I had that all worked out, but we've moved twice since then so I'll have to reconstruct my notes . . .
Where's my super-suit?

Patty Briggs

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Re: Raven duology
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2007, 07:37:14 pm »
Okay.  I do know I figured this out (it was one of the Big Plotting Problems).  It'll have to wait until I have time to reread the books though . . . So I'm going to leave this open for a while.

jackie

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Re: Raven duology
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2007, 06:54:03 am »
I just finished rereading the books myself.   I don't think it was answered sucintly.  I got the feeling the whole seeing through illusion talent kind of evolved over the course of Strike.  Kind of hard to go back and fix a book already in print, darn it!  But until this question was asked, it didn't bother me so I guess either I wasn't attentive or Patty did a good job of distracting from the problem.

Patty Briggs

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Re: Raven duology
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2007, 09:22:06 pm »
Actually I did work this out (and from the beginning).  Raven's Shadow/Strike were the only books I've ever written knowing where I was going to end up from the first few pages.  It wasn't really an outline, but a pretty detailed five or ten page treatment.  And with a while to go back over notes, here's what I came up with:

The real answer is that if you take a man in his early fifties and age him twenty years, there are some people who don't really change that much -- look at Dick Clark, for instance.  Without photographs to remind them, people wouldn't really worry about it that much.  I know a swordsmaster (as do most of the people in the Pacific Northwest) that I have known for ten or fifteen years.  When I met him he was seventy and looked fifty.  Now he's in his mid-upper eighties  . . . and looks fifty.  This is especially true in a culture (as most medieval cultures) where socio-economic factors (nutrition) played a greater role in maintaining health than mere years.

Patty Briggs

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Re: Raven duology
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2007, 11:50:48 pm »
I have a good friend who was carded at a grocery store.  I think she was forty.  The best part about it was that the checker didn't believe her license and called his manager.  His manager looked at my friend's face and said, "It's real all right.  She's way too happy about this."

Cole, what is your question about the houses?  The Memori are the essences of the houses that belonged to the wizards.  When they are called into being, they are almost real, but still stranded in time -- which is why eating food only feels like it nourishes you and why you may feel warm and freeze to death.  The bare spots in the wizard's city are the places where the wizard's houses would have been, since their essences were caught up in the Memori, the actual houses in the city rotted and aged with time.  All of the other buildings were frozen in time, exactly as they were.  That's all the detail I remember about them, but if you have more questions -- or something seems off about my answer, certainly possible as I haven't read them in a couple of years, I'll go page through them again : ;D