Author Topic: David Eddings  (Read 36579 times)

Temari

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David Eddings
« on: June 05, 2008, 06:44:27 am »
I first read The Belgariad in early teenage and I think it was the first time I laughed out loud when reading. The storyline and characters are pretty shallow, but it doesn't make the books any less enjoyable to read. If you want something easy-going and amusing, then I'd recommend the Belgariad and its sequel, The Mallorean.

Alternatively the Elenium and Tamuli series I also enjoyed. It's worth noting though that the characters are pretty much the same as the Belgariad/Mallorean, just a bit rehashed, so you may want to choose one or other of the series.

Read and enjoy!

ArtAngel

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Re: David Eddings
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2008, 01:05:44 pm »
Ah yes, I really enjoyed these books too. They are pretty shallow stories, but the interaction between the characters is really good.
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dsgholam

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Re: David Eddings
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2008, 03:25:29 pm »
Awwwe, I just loved these books. I guess I don't worry so much about shallowness as long as it keeps my interest. Both the Belgariad and the Mallorean were great, as far as I'm concerned and I also love the book "The Losers" by David Eddings. It's weird, and kind of creepy-sad, but I liked it all the same.

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e_booklover

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Re: David Eddings
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2008, 03:40:16 pm »
I liked those series too.  Yes there are simularities between the two worlds but I enjoyed the different characters.  I have been attempting to read The Younger Gods series but that one hasn't been as engaging as the others in my opinion.  Another good one is The Redemption of Althalus a single standalong book still with some common themes.  Those of us with cats could possibly enjoy it more...hint hint  ;)

Patti L.

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Re: David Eddings
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2008, 09:27:56 pm »
I like the Belgariad, Mallorean, & the Sparhawk books, although it's true that they're repetitious to some extent.  As stated earlier, the characters & their interactions make them.  I also liked Althaeus, but never tried either "The Losers" or - is it "High Hunt"?
And I haven't been able to get into the "Younger Gods" series at all.  By then even I felt he was beating a dead slook.  Not even any funny horses to enliven it, as I recall.
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ArtAngel

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Re: David Eddings
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2008, 11:56:22 pm »
I've never read "The Losers"! I should look it up :). The Redemption of Altheus is really good. The Younger Gods series is downright boring :(!
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e_booklover

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Re: David Eddings
« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2008, 09:09:28 am »
I never read The Losers, High Hunt or Regina's Song they just didn't strike my "epic" fantasy desire. 

dsgholam

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Re: David Eddings
« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2008, 09:27:22 am »
The Losers and High Hunt are often found in single volumes, though to my uncertain knowledge, they are not related. I haven't read High Hunt, but it is definitely a separate book from The Losers.

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Patti L.

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Re: David Eddings
« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2008, 01:31:24 pm »
You're right, Dsgholam, they are all stand alones.  And Regina's Song is set in/around Seattle, but it's just too creepy for me.
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munkee

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Re: David Eddings
« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2008, 12:12:34 pm »
I've read the belgraid and the mallorean series (you kind of have to read both to get the full story) also the stand alone accompaning books of both polgara and belgarath. VERY good stories, I didn't find them that shallow, simple things tend to entertain me.
I also picked up Regina's Song and WOW. Coming from one huge great and grand series to that book was like dunking in cold water, smacked in the face with a tree branch and then run over by a 4 wheeler. (don't try the last one, it hurts) very dark book that one.


rox_squirrel

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Re: David Eddings
« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2008, 07:43:14 pm »
i've enjoyed all of his books that i've read, especially the belgariad and mallorean series as well as Redemption of Altheus.  regina's song wasn't what i expected (because i was expecting something like the other books by him that i had read) but i was very interesting and gave me several things to think about.  i also had trouble getting into the younger god's series and only actually read the first book as i didn't have enough drive to seek out the others in the series

Shadowdaughter

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Re: David Eddings
« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2008, 10:20:56 am »
The Belgariad  and The Mallorean are just great. Not the deepest story, but really funny characters and witty dialogues - even in the german translation. ::)  The Elenium series is good as well, with Sparhawk being not the young dashing hero, but a more seasoned and disillusioned character.

The Redemption of Althalus had a really good start, but got more and more disappointing in the end. Althalus started as a slightly sinister character, with no concience and a severe interest in other peoples possessions, and ended as a sort of henpecked, subdued husband... no, not to my liking at all.



 

gryphon340

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Re: David Eddings
« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2008, 02:38:52 pm »
I read both big series from him. the vibe "gods" wasn't good for me.
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Nifty

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Re: David Eddings
« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2008, 06:54:02 am »
I can still vividly remember being 13 years old and standing in the fantasy section of B. Dalton bookstore and picking up Pawn of Prophecy.  I had never been much of a reader, but a 7th-grade school assignment to read The Hobbit changed all that.  I loved The Hobbit and became a voracious reader of fantasy novels (so much so that the exclusivity of my reading preferences freaked my parents out a little).  Now, 25 years later, the Belgariad and the Mallorean still occupies a warm place in my heart...and on my bookshelf.  I re-read the series about once a year, and they still make me giggle.  (Love the scene in the 2nd book when Garion is learning to shave, and the guys are all giving him pointers.  Hettar -- wonderful, dry, serious Hettar -- warns him to be careful around the nose.  "A man looks funny without a nose.")

I know that the series is your typical boy-and-phrophecy fantasy, but that doesn't make it any less entertaining or the characters any less appealing.  And today I still look back on it and appreciate the magic system -- and its inherent limitations -- that Eddings created.  I'm not a fan of unchecked, limitless power as a device in fantasy novels, and too often we see authors go that route...to the detriment of their story and characters, I think. 

And just as a side question, how do you guys pronounce Belgarath's name?  Do you say bel-GARE-eth, or do you say bel-ga-RATH?  Or do you pronounce it some other way?  I've always pronounced it bel-ga-RATH.  Since the "bel" is a prefix that denotes his descipleship to Aldur, his original name was Garath, and I doubt it was pronounced ga-RATH.  But I just can't bring myself to call Belgarath bel-GARE-eth.  Seems weird.
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Temari

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Re: David Eddings
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2008, 12:14:03 pm »
I think I pronounce it bel-ga-rath, but without any emphasis on any syllable. I know several people called Garath so I just tack the 'bel' on the front, same as 'Anne' or 'Mary-Anne'.